The solution to all

Worried. Frustrated. The solution to all that can be found in prayer. In prostration. Seek Allah The Almighty and you will find the greatest comfort. That is the best antidote you need for stressed souls and aching hearts. Call out to Him, He will surely do what is best for you.

Maulana Imtiyaz Sidat

Love and hate

Do not let your love be obsessive and do not let your hatred be destructive. When you love, do not go to a level of obsession as a child does with the things he loves & when you hate, do not hate in such way that you want your opponent to be destroyed.

Umar RA

Focus on yourself

If you find yourself & your conversation focusing on people; what’s going on in their lives, their relationships, their social status etc, then you have a serious problem on your hand. You need to get out of that mould; focus on yourself rather than being concerned with others.

As the Eid Greetings start…

Beware…

As your phone goes into meltdown with Eid greetings, and as you rush around to prepare for Eid tomorrow beware of this distraction that robs you of the final precious hours of Ramadan. Make time even if a little between now and maghrib to cut off all distractions, turn to Allah and make heartfelt duas for Him to accept your Ramadan and save you from disgrace on the day of Judgement and the hellfire and to enter you into the eternal gardens of peace by His Mercy. Pray for yourself your parents your families and the Ummah.

Weep, plead and beg in these golden moments that will not return for another year

Actions are determined by how we finish so let’s make up for our shortcomings and deficiencies that we had this month in these last few hours of this most amazing and blessed of months.

This Eid…

They had their haircuts the night before Eid and then hit town to get some nice new clothes for the night out they had planned for Eid.

It was going to be wicked, they were going to look sharp and fresh and the ladies of Birmingham would be flocking around them that night! Imran brought himself some Louboutins, a new aftershave and Riz spent 400 on a blazer from Selfridges, when he had gotten home from the haircut before he left for town his mother had asked him to take her shopping. He told her he was busy and instead called her a taxi so she could go herself. “Got things to do enit ammi flipping hell always doing my head in” he shouted as he left, slamming the front door, and leaving home. His mother was single, abusive husband had finally left her after years of torment. He had met another woman and was undoubtedly ruining her life too.

The boys went home and showered then prepared for the big night out. Imran had rented out an M4 for the weekend and they were going to drive it even though they planned to drink the night away. They left home, for the last time ever.

It was 2am and the boys were intoxicated. In a heaving club where they’d managed to pull 2 friends who were visiting Birmingham for the weekend. Riz slurred to them that they were going to take the girls on a mad cruise and showed photos of the car they had hired, the girls thought wow these boys have money and were taken by the idea. 30 minutes later and Imran was doing 120mph down a road where the max speed was 40mph. The girls had been dropped off as they were scared of the way Imran was driving and Riz was vomiting in the passenger seat as he’d drank too much.
It was a cold night and the crunching impact sent a shockwave through the icy still air as they smashed into a brick wall trying to avoid the roundabout they had suddenly approached. The occupants of the car died instantly that night. Intoxicated.

Family unaware, as their blood spilled into the street and people slowly began to gather. Later, as their bodies lay cold on metal beds in the hospital morgue it was their families who screamed, it was their families who suffered, they cried and prayed because of the way they had died.

Blood tests indicated alcohol and cocaine. Imagine that was you, planning your night out and you died. It doesn’t have to be a car crash, or even if you’re drunk.

Imagine you die doing something displeasing to Allah? Be scared and repent before it’s too late. This Eid please don’t let this status be about you. Drive carefully and remember the angel of death could be coming for you….. #Share

Why Religious Fasting Could Be Good for Your Brain

By Andrea Useem | September 17, 2008
http://pokedandprodded.health.com

Ramadan is in its third week now, and the required dawn-to-dusk fasting often feels like a daily mini–marathon. By late afternoon, hunger and thirst have sucked me dry, leaving me sleepy, slow-minded, and sometimes short-tempered.

I know that the purpose of fasting is spiritual—God will reward us in the next life—but in this lifetime, fasting sometimes makes me an ineffective, irritable person. So I was excited to learn that Harvard psychiatrist John Ratey, MD, had spoken at a recent Renaissance Weekend event about how caloric restriction can improve brain function.

I emailed Dr. Ratey to find out if those benefits might extend to religious fasting, and he sent me a 2006 paper on the brain functioning of men during the Ramadan fast. The researchers studied a small group of healthy men during and after the holy month, looking at their brain activity via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). They concluded that “all individual results showed consistent and significant increase of activity in the motor cortex during fasting.”

Other research shows similar results
That research builds on the work of other scientists, including Mark Mattson, PhD, who heads a neuroscience lab at the NIH’s National Institute on Aging. Mattson has done important research on how dietary restrictions can significantly protect the brain from degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s.

In a 2003 article, Mattson and others reported that rats who were deprived of food every other day, or restricted to a diet at 30% to 50% of normal calorie levels, showed not only decreased heart rates and blood pressure, but also “younger” brains, with “numerous age-related changes in gene expression.”

Mattson and his colleagues also shared data from research on humans, which shows that populations with higher caloric intakes—such as the United States and Europe—have a greater prevalence of Alzheimer’s than do populations that eat less—such as China and Japan. The authors speculate that humans may have adapted to conditions of feast and famine; the stress of having little food, they write, “may induce changes in gene expression that result in adaptive changes in cellular metabolism and the increased ability of the organism to reduce stress.”

Although this research is relatively new, with many questions left unanswered, the authors conclude that “it seems a safe bet that if people would incorporate a spartan approach to food intake into their lifestyles, this would greatly reduce the incidence of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and stroke.” (Of course, how this recommendation translates for individual people remains almost a complete unknown; consult with your own doctor before restricting your diet in dramatic ways.)

But here’s the hard part: Although we know eating too much leads to all sorts of health problems, “it has proven very difficult to successfully implement prolonged dietary-restriction regimens,” reports Mattson and his team. Information and doctor’s orders are rarely enough motivation.

This last observation gave me hope, because it seemed the authors were overlooking the role of religion; it can inspire people in ways information or experts don’t. Would I be undergoing this rigorous month of fasting unless I believed strongly it was the right thing for me to do? Probably not. And the same goes for millions of Muslims around the world.

And many other religions include fasting or dietary restrictions as part of their religious observances. Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, or Mormons, for example, fast one Sunday a month. The Orthodox Church in America notes five separate fasting seasons on its website, in addition to individual fast days; during some of these fasts, all food is restricted, and during other fasts, only certain foods are off-limits. Some Roman Catholics abstain from meat on Fridays, and all do during Lent. Many types of Buddhist monks abide by a code that prohibits eating after noon each day.

Science may only now be discovering that some of these religious practices, both ancient and modern, offer nourishment not just for the soul, but for the body as well.

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