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Maulana Abdul Hayy Lucknawi

Maulana Abdul Hayy Lucknawi [1264 – 1304 A.H.]

He was born in Banda, India, on Tuesday 26 Zul Qada 1264 A.H, author of many famous works and a great scholar of his time. He was a descendant Sayyidina Abu Ayyub Ansari (R.A).

His predecessors emigrated from Madinah Munawwarah to Hirat, then to Lahore, Delhi and finally to Sihala and Firangi Mahal near Lucknow. Pious and noble scholars always inhabited this locality.

Maulana Abdul Hayy began memorising the Noble Qur’an at the age of five. He was endowed with an outstanding memory from childhood to the extent that in his own words, he remembers the time when he was beaten at the age of three.

He initially learnt the Quran by Hafiz Qasim Ali. Subsequently his parents relocated to Jaunpur where he continued his by Hafiz Ibraheem. He completed memorising the Quran at the age of ten. During the period of his hifz, he also studied some Persian books under his learned father.

When he turned eleven, he began his Islamic studies under his father who was at that time teaching in Jaunpur. He learnt all the books from Mizanus Sarf (Arabic Morphology) till tafsir Baydawi, qualifying at the age of seventeen. After the demise of his father, he studied some books in mathematics under his fathers tutor, Maulana Muhammad Ni’matullah. (1290 A.H)

Allah Ta’ala endowed Maulana Abdul Hayy from childhood with the love of teaching and writing. Any book that he learnt, he taught it thereafter. As a consequence, he developed uncanny ability in every subject. No textbook on any subject remained difficult for him to the extent that he was able to teach books he had not previously studied by any tutor like Al Isharat of Tusi, Al ufuqul Mubin and Qanunut Tibb etc.

He taught for a while in Hyderabad. Subsequently he left for Lucknow where he remained for the rest of his life serving Deen. Maulana Abdul Hayy ibn Fakhruddin Nadwi (1896 – 1923), the father of Maulana Abul Hasan Nadwi and the author of Nuzhatul Khawatir, narrates that he attended Maulana Abdul Hayy’s Majlis (lecture) several times and found him to be extremely intelligent, erudite, an ocean of knowledge, well acquainted with the intricacies Shariah to the extent that he became an internationally recognised scholar. Whenever there was any discussion with scholars, Maulana Abdul Hayy would remain silent until all the scholars had spoken and they would eventually turn to him of a decisive statement. Everyone would unanimously accept his verdict. He was one of the wonders of India and none disputed his matchless virtue.

His students were completely satisfied with his methodology. Maulana Ni’matullah, his teacher, used to extol his praises generously. Due to intense love for writing, he wrote more than a hundred books on many subjects like Arabic grammar, morphology, logic, Jurisprudence and Hadith etc.

He was offered the post of Justice after his father’s demise but refused, considering the dangers of the occupation and being content with the little possessions he had. He felt that had he accepted the offer, it would have impeded his teaching and writing career.

One of the great bounties of Allah Ta’ala upon him was his excellence and compatibility with the science of Hadith and Jurisprudence of Hadith. He always chose a moderate, accepting the view of the Jurists as long as there was adequate proof from Quran and Hadith.

Allah Ta’ala also granted him the ability to see true dreams in which he would be given some indications. He saw Sayyidina Abu Bakr, Umar, ibn Abbas, Fathima. Aisha, Umme Habibah and Muawiyah (radiyallahu anhum ajmaeen). In his dreams and he also met Imam Malik (rah), Shamasud Deen Sakhawi, Imam Suyuti and other scholars, from whom he benefited as mentioned in a separate book on this on this topic.

The Mufti of Makkah, Sheikh Ahmad Ibn Zain Dahlan granted him permission for all isnad (chain of narration) from Al Hidayah of Marghinanai as well as what he had learnt from all his teachers. Mufti Muhammad Ibn Abdullah Hanbali of Makkah, Sheikh Muhammad Ibn Muhammad Al- Gharbi and Sheikh Abdul Ghani Dehlwi also granted him permission for various isnad.

He passed away in Rabi ul Awwal 1304 A.H. at the young age of 39 and was buried in the graveyard of his ancestors.
An Nasihah – February 2003
source: Jamiatul Ulama (KwaZulu-Natal)

May Allah swt forgive him, grant him mercy, and elevate his status. May Allah also give us the ability to benefit from the written works of the Maulana.
Ameen.

Cheap Ticket to Paradise

A man from a respectable background came to Balkh in Iran, accompanied by his wife and daughters. Shortly after their arrival the man fell ill and later died, leaving his wife and daughters. Without his support they became poor and suffered. So fearing the mockery of enemies, she fled Balkh with her daughters to another town.

On the day she arrived the weather was very cold, so she left her daughters in a mosque and went out in search of food. She passed by two groups of people. One was gathered around a Muslim who was the Sheikh and the other group around a Zoroastrian (Majusi) who was the security officer of the city.

She first went to the Sheikh and described her situation saying, “I am a woman of a respectable family, with daughters whom I have left in the local mosque, I have come in search of food.” He asked her, “Bring me proof that you are from a respectable family.” She replied, “I am a stranger in this town and therefore do not know anyone to testify for me.” She departed from him brokenhearted.

She then went to the Zoroastrian and explained her situation to him, telling him about her noble background and her orphaned daughters who were,waiting her return. She also mentioned to him how the Sheikh had treated her. The Zoroastrian stood up and sent some womenfolk to bring her daughters and took all of them to his house. There he showered them with honour and generosity. He fed them fine food and clothed them in rich garments.

That night the Sheikh saw in a dream the Day of Resurrection and the banners were unfurled around the Prophet (Peace be Upon him). Ahead of him, was a green palace made of emeralds, its balconies of pearls and rubies and domes of pearls and corals. He asked the Prophet (Peace be Upon him), “Messenger of Allah, for whom is this palace?” The Prophet (Peace be Upon him) replied, “For a Muslim.” The Sheikh replied, “I am a Muslim!” The Prophet (Peace be Upon him) said, “Prove to me that you are a Muslim?” At that, the Sheikh was dumbstruck. The Prophet (Peace be Upon him) then said, “You asked a woman to produce proof of her respectability, and therefore my question to you, is can you produce proof that you are a Muslim?” At this point the Sheikh felt remorse about his treatment towards the woman and her orphaned daughters.

In the morning, he immediately set out to find the woman. He learnt she was staying with the Zoroastrian and so called for him. When the Zoroastrian arrived, the Sheikh requested that he sends the woman and her daughters to him. The Zoroastrian replied, “Under no circumstance! I have received great blessings from her.” The Sheikh said “Take a thousand dinars ftom me and bring them to me.” He shouted, “Impossible! The one who showed you the palace in your dream has made it (the palace) for me. Are you surprised because I am not a Muslim? By Allah, I did not sleep last night, before I and my family accepted Islam at that noble woman’s hand, and I dreamt something similar to what you dreamt; the Messenger of Allah (Peace be Upon him) asked me, “Is that noble woman and her daughters with you?” I replied: “Yes, Messenger of Allah.” The Prophet (Peace be Upon him) said, “This palace is for you and your family. Allah created you a believer in pre-eternity.”

At that the Sheikh remained sorrowful and grieved for the missed opportunity of earning a lofty position in Paradise, due to his neglect of the widowed woman and her daughters. Allah’s Messenger (Peace be Upon him) has said, “The one who strives on behalf of the widow and the needy is like a warrior in the path of Allah”. (Bukhari and Muslim,)

May Allah guide us to what is right for indeed, He is Generous, the most Kind, the most Merciful!

Stories of the Pious by Shaykh Ahmad Ali

Introduction

All praise is due to Allah, The Most Beneficent and The Most Merciful. We praise Him, and seek His forgiveness. We seek refuge in Allah from the evils of ourselves and the mischief of our deeds. Whomsoever Allah guides cannot be misguided and whomsoever Allah misguides cannot be guided. Peace and blessings be upon the final messenger, Muhammad (SAW), upon his family and his noble companions Ameen.

Whilst on a visit to Darul-Uloom AI-Arabiya, Lancashire; in search of material for a lecture, by chance I came across a very beautiful piece of work. It was the book ‘Rawdur-Ryyahen Fee Hikaayaat as-Saliheen’ written by a master of the 7th century. The book contains around 500 beautiful stories about the pious, their experiences and their karamaat (miracles). Having read this book I was very intrigued, and realizing that the author had compiled these stories because of his love for the Awliya; immediately the thought of translating the book and benefiting the English speaking Muslims came to mind. However, fearing that I may not be able to complete the translation of the whole book I decided finally to at least translate a few stories to express my love for the Awliya. I hope one day Allah will give tawfiq to somebody to translate the whole book.

The author of the original work, which consists of around 600 pages and 500 stories, was Afifud-Din Abdullah bin As’ad Al- Yamani al- Yafi’ee as-Shafi’ee. Born 696AH near Aadan, Yemen; he was a man of great capability which began to show at a very early age. He benefited from, and studied under, Qadi Najmuddin at-Tabri; Radi -ud- din at- Tabri; Salih Mohammed bin Ahmad al Bassal; Shaykh Sharfud Ahmad bin ali al-Harazi. Acknowled and praised by his teachers he was a great scholar who spent his life serving the deen and his 44 works bear witness to this. His most famous work was ‘Rawdur-Raiyaheen’. He died in 768AH (May Allah grant him paradise).

    Virtues of Durood

    Muslim narrated in his Sahih from Abu Hurairah (may Allah be pleased with him) that the Messenger of Allah (may Allah bless him and give him peace) said ‘he who invokes blessings on me once, Allah sends ten blessings upon him.’

    Al-Nasa’i narrated in ‘Invocations of the day and night’, from ‘Umar bin Dinar (may Allah be pleased with him) that the Prophet (may Allah bless him and give him peace) said ‘he of my community who invokes blessings upon me sincerely, Allah will bless him ten fold and raise him ten degrees, and he will have written for him ten good deeds, and erased from his record ten bad deeds.’

    Tirmidhi narrated that ‘Umar ibn al-Khattab (may Allah be pleased with him) said ‘Verily, supplications are stalled between the heavens and the earth, and are not lifted up until the supplicant invokes blessings upon the Prophet (may Allah bless him and give him peace).’

    Tirmidhi related from Abdullah bin Mas’ud (may Allah be pleased with him) that the Messenger of Allah (may Allah bless him and give him peace) said ‘the closest people to me on the Day of Resurrection will be those who invoked the most blessings upon me.’

    Tirmidhi narrated from ‘Amir bin Rani’ah (may Allah be pleased with him) that the Prophet (may Allah bless him and give him peace) said ‘he who invokes blessings upon me, the Angels send blessings upon him equal to that which he invoked, so let the worshipper invoke some, or increase upon that.’

    Divine Wonder

    Quench spirit’s thirst
    Satisfy soul’s hunger
    Read the noble Quran
    Be a part of divine wonder

    It has wisdom in orders
    It has knowledge in stories
    Peace is its message
    Having solution to worries

    With its beam wants do not wander
    With its shadow tongues do not waver
    Countless are its benefits
    A witness of Allah’s favor

    Read it once, twice or thrice
    It never loses its freshness
    Strange tales never become old
    As they stand proud in uniqueness

    Lives stitched on its fabric
    Homes built on its soil
    Will be placed in best lands
    An Honest reward for their toil

    Killing the beast inside you
    It brings out your purest form
    Washing away waste desires
    It clears obsolete norms

    Never astray it will lead you
    Nor wandering it will leave you
    Hold on to its rope firmly; and
    Your name will be in the ‘Few’.

    The search man is involved in
    End on its door,
    Stepping into its world
    He needs to search no more.

    by Zoya Eitezaz Ahmed

    Entering/ Leaving a House

    2.1 HOW TO ENTER
    Enter or leave your house with your right foot first, as it was the tradition of the Prophet. Imaam Abul Ala Hasan ibn Ahmad al-Hamazani, a great scholar of Hadith of his time, was so keen on applying this Sunnah to the extent that if someone entered his house with their left foot first, he would ask them to go out and re-enter with their right foot first. He was so much respected that the Sultan of the day would visit him at school and sit in front of him as a student. At one occasion, he told the Sultan to exit with his right foot first and walk on the right side of the road.

    When entering or leaving a house, do not push the door violently, or slam it shut, or leave it to close by itself wildly. Such actions stand in contrast to the gracefulness of Islam to which you are honoured to belong. Close the door quietly with your hand. You may have heard a Hadith reported by Imam Muslim whereby ‘Aisha (RA) quotes the Prophet: ‘Gentleness adorns every act. Its absence will tarnish it.’

    2.2 ENTERING WHILE OTHERS ARE ASLEEP
    If you enter a place where people are sleeping, whether during day or night, be quiet and gentle. Be considerate. Do not cause any undue noise when entering or exiting. You have heard the saying of the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم): ‘Whoever is deprived of gentleness, is deprived of all sorts of goodness.’ Muslim and Al-Tirmidhi reported that the honourable companion Al-Miqdad bin Al-Aswad (RA) said: ‘We used to preserve the Prophet’s share of the milk, when he came back at night he would greet us with a voice loud enough for those awake to hear, without disturbing those who were asleep.’ In addition, whenever the Prophet used to pray at night, he would recite the Quran with a voice that pleased those that were awake, without disturbing those that were asleep.’

    Princess Qatrul Nada (Dew point) was famous for her intelligence, manners and beauty. She was the daughter of Khimarwaih bin Ahmad bin Toulon, the King of Egypt. She married Al-Mu’taded Billah. Qatrul Nada said: ‘My father taught me an important manner – do not sleep among sitting people and do not sit among sleeping people.’

    from the book ISLAMIC MANNERS
    By Shaykh Abdul-Fattaah Abu Ghuddah (RA)

    Bad Weather Days

    Assalam Alaykum,

    Recently we had a fair amount of snowfall and it actually settled which is rather unusual for us.  Anyway, one morning whilst walking through the snow I was amazed to see a lady jogging through the snow.  About a day or so later, I see another man running whilst it is still snowing in the early evening as I walk home from work.  Both of these individuals were jogging/ running as part of their exercise routine.

    This got me thinking in that see how someone can be so dedicated to a particular task/ cause when they put their mind to it.  They know the outcome that if they continue to train they will eventually achieve their goal.  The goal maybe to keep fit or merely to avoid being a couch potatoe. They come across days like the above, with bad weather but still they remain undeterred.

    Why do I mention this?  Well the case of a believer is similar, they know (should know!) the outcome if they do/ don’t follow the requirements laid out by the deen of Islam.  This needs to be often remembered so that we keep ourselves in check and avoid straying from the straight path.  We need to keep at the forefront of our mind the continuous effort we should make to increase our good deeds and please Almighty Allah.

    Just like the runners mentioned above, the Muslim will also come accross ‘days with bad weather’ but we should not fear or despair but take it in our stride, be patient and carry on with our end goal in mind.  It maybe hard at first but with duah and perseverance, Insha’Allah we will remain strong and not waiver, even during these bad days.

    Its now running late so I will end here.  These were just a few words to invoke some thoughts and keep us motivated.  All good is from Allah alone, and any mistake are from my own shortcomings.

    Please remember me and my family in your duas and pray I am able to keep the site updated more frequently in future.

    Wasalam

    Your Deeds Alone Are Faithful

    In this world you have three companions:
    one is faithful, the others are treacherous.

    The latter are friends and possessions;
    the faithful one is excellence in deeds.

    Your wealth won’t come with you out of your palace;
    your friend will come, but only as far as the grave.

    When the day of doom comes to meet you,
    your friend will say, “I’ve come this far, but no farther. I will stand a while at your grave.”

    Your deeds alone are faithful: make them your refuge,
    for they alone will accompany you into the depths of the tomb.
    Mawlana Jalal al-Din al-Rumi

    Importance of Appearance

    1.1 Distinct Muslim Personality

    Islam advocates this etiquette and stresses it so as to perfect the Muslim personality and to bring about harmony among people. There is no doubt that embodying such manners and virtues enhances personal style and qualities, refines personality and brings us closer to the hearts and minds of others. The forthcoming manners and etiquette are central to Islam, its purposes and its aims. Calling it ‘etiquette’ by no means implies that it is marginal to life and social behaviour. It does not mean Muslims have the option of ignoring this code of behaviour, or that it is merely preferable to adhere to it.

    In pointing out that manners rank higher than deeds, Imam Al-Qar�fi in his book Al-Furw’q said, ‘Learn that a little etiquette is better than a lot of good actions.’ Rw’aim, the righteous scholar, told his son, ‘Oh my son, make your deeds salt, and your manners flour.’ Many good manners with few good deeds are better than many good
    deeds with few good manners. Even if some of these rules appear to be simple common courtesy, it is important to highlight their significance. Many Muslims commit errors which blemish the Islamic personality, whose purpose is meant to be unique in its beauty, perfection and traits. Our master, the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) directed the blessed companions by saying: ‘You are on your way to meet your brothers, put on a nice dress and fix your riding so you appear distinct among people as a fleck [on a beautiful face]. Allah does not like roughness nor rough manners.’

    When the Prophet, peace be upon him, said: ‘No one will enter Paradise if they have at heart a grain of arrogance.’ A man asked: ‘A man may like his dress to be nice and his shoes nice.’ The Prophet answered ‘Allah is beautiful and likes beauty. Arrogance is to deny rights and look down at people.’

    Shaikh Ibn Taimia said that the beauty that Allah likes include nice clothes. Hence it could be said that Allah likes all nice things. Therefore, a Muslim ought to be recognized by neat dress, cleanliness and graceful appearance.

    1.2 CLEANLINESS AND WASHING

    The Sunna is to keep perfume and to use it regularly on oneself. Al-Bukhari narrated that Salman Al-Farsi said: the Prophet, peace be upon him, said ‘Allah will forgive the sins of the past week for he who on Friday will take a bath, cleanse himself, put on his [regular] perfume or any perfume available in house. Then, he goes out [to Jumu’ah prayer] and does not try to separate two friends. Then he prays wherever he could and listens to the Imam.’ If the body became odorous a day or two before Friday, one should not wait till Friday to cleanse the body. We should wash our bodies as soon as it require washing to keep ourselves clean and fresh.

    To take a bath on Friday is specifically required since a large number of people will be gathering at mosques. However, if our body became dirty or we sweat on a particular day, then, we should take a bath at the end of day or the next morning. This is indicated by a Hadith narrated by Al-Bukhari and Muslim that Abu Huraira said, the Prophet, peace be upon him, said: ‘It is the duty of every Muslim to have a bath once every week to wash his head and body.’ Another Hadith

    1.3 ARRIVING FROM A JOURNEY

    If you are traveling to visit someone or if you are about to receive guests, whether those in question are your parents, relatives, peers, or friends of a different age, make sure that your hands, feet, and socks are clean, and your appearance and clothing is neat. Never neglect or underestimate the importance of your look, for that would certainly mar the pleasure of the meeting, while dulling the enjoyment of those you meet. In this regard, the Prophet directed his companions upon returning from a journey: ‘You are returning to your brethren, dress nicely, and sort out your rides so that you may become a beauty mark among people, for Allah does not like sloppiness or acting in a sloppy way.’

    Try to bring some gifts to those receiving you, and likewise present your guests with a present. Always be prepared to reciprocate with a suitable gift. The subtle joy of seeing your beloved ones will be vividly remembered for many years. A gift, however symbolic, will greatly enhance the pleasure of such a meeting. The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم), as reported by Bukhary, said: ‘Exchange gifts; exchange love.’ Our Muslim predecessors used to leave their host with a present which could be as symbolic as an Arak stick.

    1.4 DRESS PROPERLY WITH FAMILY AND FRIENDS

    Dress properly, even among friends and relatives. Dress properly when visiting your parents, a pious person, an elder, or even a relative or a friend. Your attire should be clean and elegant, not ugly or unsightly. We are attracted or repulsed by what we see. If you look good in clean clothes, smelling nice, you will be pleasant to look at and people will be attracted to you and enjoy your presence. If you were the opposite, people will look down on you even if you were a relative or friend. To look good while visiting or being visited is an instinctive trait in addition to being an Islamic manner. Do not ignore this aspect because you consider yourself to be close to your hosts or guests.

    Imam Bukhari in his book, ‘Al-Adab Al-Mufrad’ reported that the great follower Abi Al-�Alia Al-Riahi Al-Basri said, ‘Muslims were at their best when visiting each other.’ Al-Hafez Al-Haithami in ‘Majma Al-Zawaed’ (1:169) reported that Thabet Al-Banani, the student of Imam Anas bin Malik said, ‘When I used to visit Anas, he would call for a perfume and run it along his cheeks.’ Accordingly, if you were visited at home while dressed very casually, as it sometimes happens, you should change for your visitor. This will enhance his respect for you and will complement your hospitality. It is, after all, the manners of the early Muslims.

    from the book ISLAMIC MANNERS
    By Shaykh Abdul-Fattaah Abu Ghuddah (RA)

    Slippery Stone: An Inquiry into Islam’s Stance on Music

    By Khalid Baig

    What does Islam say about poetry, singing, musical instruments, musicians, and the business of music? What is the truth about the much-publicized “music controversy” in Islam? This book demystifies the issue of music in Islam. More than six hundred references and more than a hundred twenty biographical notes on the authorities quoted add to the value of a discussion that is comprehensive without being boring, and detailed without being confusing.

    What does Islam say about poetry, singing, musical instruments, musicians, and the business of music? How have Muslim societies historically looked at these questions and how have their attitudes changed in the media age? Why have mosques remained music-free while churches have not? What is the truth about the much-publicized “music controversy” in Islam? Why did Sufis call sama as the slippery stone? These are some of the questions explored in-depth in Slippery Stone: An Inquiry into Islam’s Stance on Music.

    Of late, increasing attempts are being made to promote “Islamic music,” and the distinction between what is allowed and what is not has become hazy and unclear for many. This book demystifies the issue of music in Islam by going to original source books in Arabic, many of them brought to light for the first time in the English language. It traces the attitudes of the Muslim society about music and the musician throughout its history and quotes extensively from the deliberations of the Qur’an and Hadith scholars and jurists from all schools of Islamic Law, both Sunni and Shi’ah. Separate chapters are devoted to a discussion of the views of Sufi masters as well as the arguments of Ibn Hazm.

     

    It examines in considerable depth the impact of colonialism and the media revolution (beginning with the gramophone) on the attitudes of Muslim societies regarding music. It also subjects the works of Orientalists to a scrutiny that was overdue.

     

    By referring to it as a slippery stone, Sufis vividly pointed out the dangers associated with this enterprise and emphasized the need for caution. History is filled with the corpses of those who fell off the slippery stone by ignoring this advice. Combining historic, cultural, and jurisprudential perspectives this book brings the truth of that metaphor into sharp relief.

     

    More than six hundred references and more than a hundred twenty biographical notes on the authorities quoted add to the value of a discussion that is comprehensive without being boring, and detailed without being confusing. This book has left no stone unturned in its examination of the slippery stone.

     

    Reviews:

     

    “… a wonderful book. May Allah accept it and may He make it a source of guidance to those who wish to be guided.

     

    Its historical sweep, its comprehensiveness, its details, its overall plan, presentation of material, a thoroughly worked out schema and anchorage in solid scholarship is simply outstanding.

     

    Its respectful handling of tricky areas, and reliance on primary sources has combined to produce a kind of book that is seldom available on a contemporary issue.

     

    Its lucidity is indicative of a light from the Divine guidance that produces in the human mind and heart a clarity of such nature.

     

    The author’s choice of using the Arabic text and the beautiful production also adds to the usefulness of the book. “ – Dr. Muzaffar Iqbal, President, Center for the Study of Islam and Science, Canada

     

    “Khalid Baig, in his Slippery Stone, has written an impressive academic tome on the issue of music, poetry and singing in Islam. He discusses the historical development of these genres in the Muslim context, and documents various theological and legal responses that followed.

     

    This work is sure to become a standard reference in its field for many years to come.” – Shaykh Yasir Qadhi, Dean of Academic Affairs, Almaghrib Institute, USA

     

    “Khalid Baig has discussed relevant issues surrounding the issue of music, singing, use of musical instruments, and popular music etc., and has explained clearly what is permissible and what is prohibited by Islam . . . The extensive list of original and secondary sources used indicate the author’s grasp of the subject.” – Syed Salman Nadvi, Formerly Professor and Chairman, Department of Islamic Studies, University of Durban-Westville

     

    “Appropriately titled, Slippery Stone deals with the topic of music in Islam in substantial detail clarifying all the issues on music in a lucid manner. Contemporary, convincing, comprehensive . . . this book is a must read for all who wish to learn about this subject.” – Mufti Zubair Bayat, Darul Ihsan Research and Education Center

     

    “For centuries, the fiqhi rulings on music have been quite evident. In this day and age of information and temptation, the minds of Muslims have become convoluted in this regards. Khalid Baig has done a marvelous job of bringing together every traditional, shar’ee, and historic evidence regarding the status of music in Islam. A must read for every Muslim who is in doubt in regards to this topic.” – Imam Tahir Anwar, Imam and Director, South Bay Islamic Association

    More info on Al Balagh bookstore – http://www.albalagh.net/bookstore/?action=view&item=1355
    Purchase in UK – http://www.azharacademy.com/scripts/prodView.asp?idProduct=1947