Tag Archives: Akhlaq

Entering/ Leaving a House

2.3 GREETING
When entering or leaving your house, acknowledge those inside. Use the greeting of Muslims and the label of Islam: ‘Assalam ‘Alãikum wa Rahmatullahi wa Barakãtuh; Peace and mercy of Allah be with you.’ Do not forego this Islamic greeting by replacing it with something else, such as ‘Good Morning,’ or ‘Hello.’ This greeting is the sign of Islam and the phrase that the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) recommended and practiced. The greeting of Muslims and Islam is: Assalam Alaikum wa Rahmatullahi wa Barakatuh. Peace, mercy, and blessing of Allah be upon you. The Prophet, peace be upon him, taught his faithful servant Anas bin Malik to greet his family when entering or leaving his house. Imam Tirmizi reported that Anas said: ‘The Messenger of Allah said to me, ‘My son, greet your family when you enter [your home], for that is a blessing for you and your family.”

Qatada, a prominent follower (Tabi’y), said: ‘Greet your family when you enter your house. They are the most worthy of your greeting.’ Al- Tirmidhi reported another Hadith whereby Abu Huraira (RA) stated that the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: ‘If you join a gathering, greet them, and if you want to leave, dismiss yourself. The first is no less important than the second.’

Imam Al-Suyuti in his book ‘Praising the Abyssinians’ cited from Abo Taleb Al-Jumahi’s Al-Tahyat the following: ‘Every nation has a way of greeting. Arabs will say salams. Persians Emperors require prostrating and kissing the floor. The Persians touch their hand on the floor in front of the king. The Abyssinians quietly, gather their hands at their chest. The Romans uncover their head and bow. The Nubians would gesture as if kissing the guest and then putting both hands on their face.’ All these greetings, except Salam, are forbidden.

Imam Nawawi in Al-Majmu said ‘It is preferred to say ‘Bismillahi Arrahman Arrahim’ when you enter your house or others’ houses. You ought to say Salam if you enter it regardless whether it was empty or occupied. You say a prayer when you go out. Imam Tirmizi and Imam Abu Dawood narrated a Hadith by Anas that the Prophet said: ‘If you say in the name of Allah, I seek help from Allah, no strength or means but with Allah. Then he will be told: you are protected and saved. The Satan will leave him.

He cited another Hadith narrated by Muslim that Jaber bin Abdullah related that he heard the Prophet, peace be upon him, saying: ‘If you enter your house and pray to Allah when entering and before your meals, the Satan will say [to his group]: No sleep and no food. If you entered it without praying to Allah. Satan will say [to his group]: You secured your sleep and dinner.’

2.4 ANNOUNCING YOUR PRESENCE
When entering a house, make your presence known to those inside before you approach them. Avoid startling or frightening them. Do not descend upon them suddenly. Abu ‘Ubãida ‘Àmer bin ‘Abdullah bin Mas’wüd (RA) said: ‘My father ‘Abdullah ibn Mas’wüd used to announce his arrival by addressing his family in a cordial tone.

Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal said: ‘When a person enters his house, it is recommended that he/she creates noise by coughing or tapping his/her shoes.’ His son Abdullah said: ‘When returning home from the mosque, my father used to announce his arrival before entering, by tapping with his shoes or coughing.’

Bukhari and Muslim reported that the Prophet denounced those who unexpectedly surprise their families at night, whether returning from travel or otherwise, because it makes them appear to be distrustful.

2.5 SEEKING PERMISSION TO ENTER
If family members are resting in their rooms, and you want to join them, it is appropriate to ask for permission and/or knock on the door. Otherwise, you may see them in a condition that you, or they for that matter, may not like. This applies to your entire household; your immediate family or otherwise. In the Muwata by ‘Ata ibn Yasãr,
Imam Malik narrated that a man asked the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) the following: ‘Should I seek permission to enter my mother’s room?’ The Prophet answered, ‘Yes.’ The man said, ‘We live together in the same house.’ The Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said, ‘Ask for permission to join her.’ The man argued, ‘But, I am her servant.’ The Prophet said, ‘Ask for permission. Would you like to see her naked?’ The man replied, ‘No!’ The Prophet said, ‘Then ask permission when entering.’

A man asked ‘Abdullah bin Mas’wüd: ‘Should I ask permission to enter my mother’s room?’ He answered him, ‘Yes. There are certain circumstances in which you would rather not see her. ‘ Zaynab, the wife of ‘Abdullah ibn Mas’wüd said that upon reaching the door, ‘Abdullah used to make noise, fearing that he might surprise us and encounter an embarrassing situation. A man asked Huzaifa ibn Al-Yamãn, ‘Should I ask permission to enter my mother’s?’ Huzaifa replied, ‘Yes, if you do not ask for her permission, you may encounter an embarrassing situation.’

Müsa the son of the companion Talha ibn ‘Obaidillah said: ‘My father went to my mother’s room. I followed him as he entered, he turned toward me and pushed me down forcing me to sit. Then he reprimanded me: ‘How dare you to enter without permission?’

Nafi,’ the patron of ‘Abdullah bin Omar said: ‘When any of Ibn Omar’s children come of age, Ibn Omar would assign him/her another room. He would not allow any of them to enter his room without permission.’

‘Ata bin Abi Rabãh asked Ibn ‘Abbas: ‘Should I seek permission when calling on my two sisters?’ Ibn Abbas answered, ‘Yes.’ I said: ‘I am their guardian, supporter and provider of their needs.’ He said, ‘Would you rather see them naked?’ Then he read the Quranic verse, ‘And when the children among you come of age, let them ask for permission, as do those senior to them in age; thus does Allah make clear His signs. Allah is full of knowledge and wisdom.’ Thus, Ibn ‘Abbas concluded that asking permission is obligatory for all people. Ibn Mas’wüd said: ‘A person should seek permission whenever entering the room of a father, mother, brother and sister.’ Jãber also said: ‘A person should seek permission whenever entering the room of a son, a daughter, a mother -even if she is old, a brother, a sister, or a father.’

from the book ISLAMIC MANNERS
By Shaykh Abdul-Fattaah Abu Ghuddah (RA)

Entering/ Leaving a House

2.1 HOW TO ENTER
Enter or leave your house with your right foot first, as it was the tradition of the Prophet. Imaam Abul Ala Hasan ibn Ahmad al-Hamazani, a great scholar of Hadith of his time, was so keen on applying this Sunnah to the extent that if someone entered his house with their left foot first, he would ask them to go out and re-enter with their right foot first. He was so much respected that the Sultan of the day would visit him at school and sit in front of him as a student. At one occasion, he told the Sultan to exit with his right foot first and walk on the right side of the road.

When entering or leaving a house, do not push the door violently, or slam it shut, or leave it to close by itself wildly. Such actions stand in contrast to the gracefulness of Islam to which you are honoured to belong. Close the door quietly with your hand. You may have heard a Hadith reported by Imam Muslim whereby ‘Aisha (RA) quotes the Prophet: ‘Gentleness adorns every act. Its absence will tarnish it.’

2.2 ENTERING WHILE OTHERS ARE ASLEEP
If you enter a place where people are sleeping, whether during day or night, be quiet and gentle. Be considerate. Do not cause any undue noise when entering or exiting. You have heard the saying of the Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم): ‘Whoever is deprived of gentleness, is deprived of all sorts of goodness.’ Muslim and Al-Tirmidhi reported that the honourable companion Al-Miqdad bin Al-Aswad (RA) said: ‘We used to preserve the Prophet’s share of the milk, when he came back at night he would greet us with a voice loud enough for those awake to hear, without disturbing those who were asleep.’ In addition, whenever the Prophet used to pray at night, he would recite the Quran with a voice that pleased those that were awake, without disturbing those that were asleep.’

Princess Qatrul Nada (Dew point) was famous for her intelligence, manners and beauty. She was the daughter of Khimarwaih bin Ahmad bin Toulon, the King of Egypt. She married Al-Mu’taded Billah. Qatrul Nada said: ‘My father taught me an important manner – do not sleep among sitting people and do not sit among sleeping people.’

from the book ISLAMIC MANNERS
By Shaykh Abdul-Fattaah Abu Ghuddah (RA)

Importance of Appearance

1.1 Distinct Muslim Personality

Islam advocates this etiquette and stresses it so as to perfect the Muslim personality and to bring about harmony among people. There is no doubt that embodying such manners and virtues enhances personal style and qualities, refines personality and brings us closer to the hearts and minds of others. The forthcoming manners and etiquette are central to Islam, its purposes and its aims. Calling it ‘etiquette’ by no means implies that it is marginal to life and social behaviour. It does not mean Muslims have the option of ignoring this code of behaviour, or that it is merely preferable to adhere to it.

In pointing out that manners rank higher than deeds, Imam Al-Qar�fi in his book Al-Furw’q said, ‘Learn that a little etiquette is better than a lot of good actions.’ Rw’aim, the righteous scholar, told his son, ‘Oh my son, make your deeds salt, and your manners flour.’ Many good manners with few good deeds are better than many good
deeds with few good manners. Even if some of these rules appear to be simple common courtesy, it is important to highlight their significance. Many Muslims commit errors which blemish the Islamic personality, whose purpose is meant to be unique in its beauty, perfection and traits. Our master, the Messenger of Allah (صلى الله عليه وسلم) directed the blessed companions by saying: ‘You are on your way to meet your brothers, put on a nice dress and fix your riding so you appear distinct among people as a fleck [on a beautiful face]. Allah does not like roughness nor rough manners.’

When the Prophet, peace be upon him, said: ‘No one will enter Paradise if they have at heart a grain of arrogance.’ A man asked: ‘A man may like his dress to be nice and his shoes nice.’ The Prophet answered ‘Allah is beautiful and likes beauty. Arrogance is to deny rights and look down at people.’

Shaikh Ibn Taimia said that the beauty that Allah likes include nice clothes. Hence it could be said that Allah likes all nice things. Therefore, a Muslim ought to be recognized by neat dress, cleanliness and graceful appearance.

1.2 CLEANLINESS AND WASHING

The Sunna is to keep perfume and to use it regularly on oneself. Al-Bukhari narrated that Salman Al-Farsi said: the Prophet, peace be upon him, said ‘Allah will forgive the sins of the past week for he who on Friday will take a bath, cleanse himself, put on his [regular] perfume or any perfume available in house. Then, he goes out [to Jumu’ah prayer] and does not try to separate two friends. Then he prays wherever he could and listens to the Imam.’ If the body became odorous a day or two before Friday, one should not wait till Friday to cleanse the body. We should wash our bodies as soon as it require washing to keep ourselves clean and fresh.

To take a bath on Friday is specifically required since a large number of people will be gathering at mosques. However, if our body became dirty or we sweat on a particular day, then, we should take a bath at the end of day or the next morning. This is indicated by a Hadith narrated by Al-Bukhari and Muslim that Abu Huraira said, the Prophet, peace be upon him, said: ‘It is the duty of every Muslim to have a bath once every week to wash his head and body.’ Another Hadith

1.3 ARRIVING FROM A JOURNEY

If you are traveling to visit someone or if you are about to receive guests, whether those in question are your parents, relatives, peers, or friends of a different age, make sure that your hands, feet, and socks are clean, and your appearance and clothing is neat. Never neglect or underestimate the importance of your look, for that would certainly mar the pleasure of the meeting, while dulling the enjoyment of those you meet. In this regard, the Prophet directed his companions upon returning from a journey: ‘You are returning to your brethren, dress nicely, and sort out your rides so that you may become a beauty mark among people, for Allah does not like sloppiness or acting in a sloppy way.’

Try to bring some gifts to those receiving you, and likewise present your guests with a present. Always be prepared to reciprocate with a suitable gift. The subtle joy of seeing your beloved ones will be vividly remembered for many years. A gift, however symbolic, will greatly enhance the pleasure of such a meeting. The Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم), as reported by Bukhary, said: ‘Exchange gifts; exchange love.’ Our Muslim predecessors used to leave their host with a present which could be as symbolic as an Arak stick.

1.4 DRESS PROPERLY WITH FAMILY AND FRIENDS

Dress properly, even among friends and relatives. Dress properly when visiting your parents, a pious person, an elder, or even a relative or a friend. Your attire should be clean and elegant, not ugly or unsightly. We are attracted or repulsed by what we see. If you look good in clean clothes, smelling nice, you will be pleasant to look at and people will be attracted to you and enjoy your presence. If you were the opposite, people will look down on you even if you were a relative or friend. To look good while visiting or being visited is an instinctive trait in addition to being an Islamic manner. Do not ignore this aspect because you consider yourself to be close to your hosts or guests.

Imam Bukhari in his book, ‘Al-Adab Al-Mufrad’ reported that the great follower Abi Al-�Alia Al-Riahi Al-Basri said, ‘Muslims were at their best when visiting each other.’ Al-Hafez Al-Haithami in ‘Majma Al-Zawaed’ (1:169) reported that Thabet Al-Banani, the student of Imam Anas bin Malik said, ‘When I used to visit Anas, he would call for a perfume and run it along his cheeks.’ Accordingly, if you were visited at home while dressed very casually, as it sometimes happens, you should change for your visitor. This will enhance his respect for you and will complement your hospitality. It is, after all, the manners of the early Muslims.

from the book ISLAMIC MANNERS
By Shaykh Abdul-Fattaah Abu Ghuddah (RA)